The Department of Internal Affairs

The Department of Internal Affairs

Te Tari Taiwhenua

Building a safe, prosperous and respected nation

 

Resource material › Research and Reports

The following reports were produced by Department of Internal Affairs, except where noted. The research undertaken by and contracted out by the Department covers a wide range of policy, operational and corporate information needs, reflecting the organisation's many areas of operation and responsibilities. More research documents can be located in our Publications Database.

Censorship Research Reports

Censorship Offender Profile Statistics (2004-present)

Since completing research for the report below, the Department of Internal Affairs has continued to gather data on offenders:

Internet Traders of Child Pornography and other Censorship Offenders in New Zealand (2004)

This research report by Angela Carr, first published in April 2004, profiles censorship offenders and examines characteristics of their offending:

Protecting Our Innocence: New Zealand's National Plan of Action Against the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (2002)

A report published by the Ministry of Justice in February 2002, provides a comprehensive examination of the four main activities that exploit children for their commercial value: child prostitution, child pornography, child sex tourism and child trafficking for sexual purposes. It also details some of the laws, social policies, administrative measures and programmes that have been developed to respond to child abuse and exploitation in general.

Censored: A Short History of Censorship in New Zealand (1989)

This publication was produced by the Department of Internal Affairs' Research Unit and published in 1989. It documents censorship issues, policy and practice in New Zealand from the colonial period until the 1980s.

Community Development Research Reports

Customer Services Research Reports

To understand whether New Zealanders are satisfied with our services, the Department's Service Delivery and Operations branch carried out a Customer Experience Survey at the end of 2012/13.

Gambling Research Reports

Research into Influences on Class 4 Gaming Machine Proceeds

This BERL report to the Department of Internal Affairs examines factors affecting spending on Class 4 gaming machines (Updated 5 April 2017):

2016 Survey of Stakeholders in Gambling Regulation - Summary of findings

Our annual survey of stakeholders in the gambling sector was carried out in September 2016. This aimed to build on our previous surveys of stakeholders, as well as introduce some new questions to help understand how the Department’s approach to regulating the Class 4 gambling sector is viewed. A response rate of 43% was achieved.

2015 Survey of Stakeholders in Gambling Regulation - Summary of findings

Our annual survey of stakeholders in the gambling sector was carried out in July 2015. We aimed to capture a wider range of perspectives than in previous surveys by including some additional individuals and stakeholder groups. A good response rate was achieved (50%).

2014 Survey of Stakeholders in Gambling Regulation - Summary of Responses

This report summarises the results of the Department of Internal Affairs' 2014 Survey of Stakeholders in Gambling Regulation and explains the methodology behind the survey.

Distribution of grants from Gaming Machine ('pokies') Societies (May 2014)

This report provides insight into the 'pokie' funding environment in the Manukau Ward and Manurewa Local Board from the perspective of class 4 gaming machine societies with venues operating in the area. Societies provided the information through workshops and requested data.

A Survey of Community and Charity Organisations in the Manukau Ward and Manurewa Local Board (2013)

This report provides insight into the ‘pokie’ funding environment in the Manukau Ward and Manurewa Local Board from the perspective of community and charity organisations in the area. Organisations provided the information through a survey conducted by the Department.

The distribution of non-casino gaming machine profits in New Zealand (2011)

Gaming machines in New Zealand are operated by non-club gaming societies who operate gaming machines in commercial venues, and clubs that typically operate gaming machines in their own premises. This report presents information on the allocation of non-casino gaming machine profits to community organisations in New Zealand in 2011. It is based mainly on data published by the non-club gaming societies. Previously the Department produced reports on the distribution of non-casino gaming machine profits from surveys conducted in 1996, 1999-2000 and 2005.

Desktop review of information available on non-club gaming society websites (2011)

Easily accessible information is an important element in supporting transparency and integrity in grant-making processes. This desktop review was conducted by the Department to identify the availability of information and highlight areas for improvement. Two of the 49 non-club societies have distinct purposes and are not required to a have website. They are not included in this review.

New Zealand Gaming Survey

The 1998-1999 research programme contains the following elements: an international overview and critique of gambling and problem gambling in the community; a follow-up study (seven years on); reports on phase one and two of the 1999 National Prevalence Survey; prison studies - problem gambling among recent male and female prisoners; synthesis report; and problem gambling counselling.

People's Participation in, and Attitudes Towards Gambling 1985 - 2005

This report is the fifth in a survey series that was first undertaken in 1985. The survey series examines people's participation in gambling activities in New Zealand, looking at: frequency of participation; expenditure on gambling; reasons for playing; and beliefs about the gambling activities. The survey series also investigates public attitudes to gambling.

Social and Economic Impacts of Gambling in New Zealand

Final Report of the Australian Institute for Gambling Research, University of Western Sydney July 2001. The aim of this study is to provide independent information on the private and public costs and benefits of gaming (both social and economic) in New Zealand.

Social Impact of Gaming

The material gathered for this report contributed to the 1995 Review of Gaming. Some of the more important social impacts examined are: participation; accessibility; public attitudes; social benefits, including supply of community resources; problem gambling; crime and other social problems.

Vulnerabilities of Casinos and Gaming Sector Report

The nature and expanding scope of the global casino sector presents a number of challenges to countering money laundering and terrorism financing according to a report for the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering (APG) and the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). The Department's Intelligence Manager led the study and drafted the report on vulnerabilities in the gaming and casinos sector, which will be used as a practical resource for governments and gaming sectors to increase awareness, strengthen interventions and training, and support international policy formation.

Where Do Gaming Machine Profits Go?

This report provides results from a 2005 survey of gaming machine operators on the contribution their profits made to authorised (community) purposes. Information was obtained from 76 per cent of gaming machine societies that were operating at the relevant time. This link also takes you to results from similar surveys in 1996 and 1999-2000.

Problem Gambling in New Zealand - A Brief Summary

From time to time, the prevalence and impacts of problem gambling in New Zealand are the subject of misinformed comment. In the interests of informed discussion, the Department, in consultation with the Ministry of Health, has compiled some key facts based on current research and other data (September 2008).

Local Government Research Reports

Lottery Grants Research Reports


Other Internal Affairs research documents (link to publications index).


*You need Adobe Reader installed on your computer to view our files. If you are unable to open the files we recommend you get the latest version of Adobe Reader. You can download and install Acrobat Reader for free from the Adobe website.