The Department of Internal Affairs

The Department of Internal Affairs

Te Tari Taiwhenua

Building a safe, prosperous and respected nation

 

Services › Casino and Non-Casino Gaming › Casinos

The Department of Internal Affairs is responsible for monitoring and ensuring compliance with the Gambling Act 2003, and with regulations, licence conditions, minimum operating standards and game rules made under that Act. It also develops casino game rules, minimum operating standards and minimum equipment standards for casinos.


Casino Gambling Inspectors

The Department of Internal Affairs is committed to ensuring gambling in casinos is fair, honest, lawful, and remains free from criminal influence or exploitation. To meet these aims, the
Gambling Compliance Group maintains a team of Gambling Inspectors in each casino.

Role of a Casino Gambling Inspector

A casino Gambling Inspector's role includes handling complaints from members of the public and ensuring casino gambling complies with the
Gambling Act 2003, minimum operating standards, minimum technical standards, and game rules.
    The role of a Casino Gambling Inspector also includes, but is not limited to:
    • Inspecting, monitoring and auditing the conduct of gambling
    • Inspecting, monitoring and auditing the counting of money and chips
    • Inspecting gambling equipment
    • Detecting, investigating, and prosecuting offences against the Gambling Act 2003
    • Detecting, investigating, and prosecuting crimes involving dishonesty that involve or relate to gambling
    • Liaising and cooperating with the New Zealand Police and other enforcement agencies
    • Investigating complaints from members of the public about the conduct of gambling in casinos.
    For more information see Fact Sheet 31: Casino Gambling Inspectors

    How a Casino Gambling Inspector Can Help You

    Part of the role of a casino Gambling Inspector is to investigate complaints made by members of public about the conduct of gambling in casinos. As a general guide a casino Gambling Inspector can help you with concerns and complaints about any of the following matters:
    • The integrity of gambling equipment in any casino
    • The way gambling is being conducted in any casino
    • The integrity of any casino employee
    • The integrity of the casino operation
    • The presence of under age patrons (patrons must be 20 years of age to enter a casino).
    At a casino you may advise any casino employee that you wish to speak to a casino Gambling Inspector. Alternatively you can phone, email or write to a casino Gambling Inspector and pass on any information or lay a formal complaint. Casino Gambling Inspectors will independently investigate your complaint and inform you of the findings.

    Contact a Casino Gambling Inspector

    Email:
    casino.compliance@dia.govt.nz

    Casino Gambling Inspectors have an office in every region in which a casino operates: Contact Information


    Casino Licences

    Under the
    Gambling Act 2003 no new casino venue licences will be issued. The Casino Control Authority Act was repealed on 1 July 2004 and the Casino Control Authority was disestablished on 1 October 2004.

    For more information see Fact Sheet 28: Casinos


    Current Regulations

    Regulations have been made under the
    Gambling Act 2003 to help achieve the objectives of the Act. Regulations apply to individuals and organisations that are authorised to operate gambling.
    Regulations 9, 10 and 11 of the Gambling (Harm Prevention and Minimisation) Regulations 2004 came into force in 2005. These are:
    • The requirement to provide information on problem gambling at Class 4 and casino venues (regulation 11) - effective from 1 April 2005
    • The restriction on jackpot advertising at Class 4 and casino venues (regulation 9) - effective from 1 October 2005
    • The restriction on jackpot branding (regulation 10) - effective from 1 October 2005.

    More Information


    Rules of Casino Games

    • Rules of Casino Table Games
      (includes blackjack, baccarat, caribbean stud poker, tournament play, roulette, electronic roulette, tai sai, money wheel, electronic money wheel, craps, pai gow, poker, tournament poker, ultimate texas hold'em, three card poker, casino war, and rules of casino promotions)

    Regulation of Casinos

    The responsibility for regulation of the gambling sector is shared between the
    Gambling Commission, the Department of Internal Affairs and the Ministry of Health.

    The Gambling Commission's role is to:
    • Set licence conditions for casinos
    • Consider applications for the renewal of casino venue licences when they expire (the first expires in 2019)
    • Decide whether to suspend or cancel a casino operator's or venue licence
    • Consider casino venue agreements (and changes to venue agreements) between casino operators and venue licence holders
    • Consider applications for casino operators’ licences
    • Consider and decide appeals against Department of Internal Affairs decisions relating to Class 3 and Class 4 gambling licences and licensed promoters’ licences
    • Consider and decide appeals relating to Department of Internal Affairs decisions on Minimum Operating Standards
    • Consider and decide appeals on decisions by the Department of Internal Affairs on Certificates of Approval for casino employees
    • Consider and decide appeals on decisions by the Department of Internal Affairs on associated persons in casinos
    • Consider and deal with complaints about the Department of Internal Affairs’ handling of complaints about Class 4 gambling
    • Have an independent role in the problem gambling levy setting process
    • Advise the Minister on matters relating to Gambling Commission functions.
    The Gambling Commission has the powers of a Commission of Inquiry.


    Associated Persons

    The Gambling Act 2003 requires that persons who have or will have a
    significant influence in a casino must be approved as an associated person for that casino. The meaning of significant influence is defined in section 7 of the Gambling Act 2003.

    For more information see Fact Sheet 29: Associated Persons - Casinos

    Either the Gambling Commission or the Secretary for Internal Affairs will be responsible for approving associated persons, depending on the circumstances. Before someone can be approved as an associated person the Secretary must be satisfied that the person is suitable. Investigations into the suitability of prospective associated persons is thorough and extensive. The suitability of prospective associated persons must be investigated to ensure the integrity of the management, ownership and operation of casinos in New Zealand.

    An assessment of suitability requires the completion of an Associated Persons Application Form.

    For more information contact the Gambling Compliance Group.


    Certificates of Approval

    The Gambling Act 2003 requires that all persons must hold a
    Certificate of Approval if they are employed in a casino in any capacity relating to the following:
    • Conducting casino games
    • Counting money or chips derived from or used in gambling
    • Moving money or chips derived from or used in gambling
    • Buying or redeeming chips
    • Operating, maintaining, constructing, or repairing gambling equipment
    • Supervising or managing any of the above activities.
    Positions in these areas involve handling large sums of money and chips and can impact on the integrity of gaming. It is in the public interest that people in these positions are honest, trustworthy and reliable. The approval system is designed to assure the integrity of casino employees. For more information contact the Gambling Compliance Group.


    More Information


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