The Department of Internal Affairs

The Department of Internal Affairs

Te Tari Taiwhenua

Building a safe, prosperous and respected nation

 

Gambling statistics: casino compliance with Gambling Act


21/4/2005

The Department of Internal Affairs has today released quarterly statistics summarising compliance activity in casinos.

Summary of casino compliance statistics, July 2004 – March 2005:

July
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Totals
Investigations by Gambling Inspectors
16
13
13
16
9
23
11
12
9
122
Problem gamblers:
713
Problem gamblers:- excluded by casinos
22
36
18
20
18
13
20
8
14
169
Problem gamblers:- self-excluded
68
69
77
63
64
40
50
47
66
544

Department Deputy Secretary Andrew Secker said that the Department has Gambling Inspectors working in each of the country’s six casinos. Their roles include:
  • Investigating complaints from gamblers and the public about the casino
  • monitoring casino operations to ensure that they comply with the Gambling Act, regulations and other rules
  • carrying out regular audits of casino operations.

    The investigations carried out by Inspectors include those in relation to gamblers’ complaints, Certificates of Approval for casino staff, alleged breaches by the casino operators, alleged cheating, and access to gambling areas by people aged under 20.

    Since 1 July 2004 the Act has required casinos to have policies to identify and approach problem gamblers.
    Mr Secker said that casinos’ staff are playing a significant role in encouraging problem gamblers to use self-exclusion programmes: “This is a good option because it helps problem gamblers themselves accept that they have a problem and do something about getting help to fix it.

    “However, the Act also gives casinos the power to impose exclusion orders on problem gamblers, and casinos are also using that power.”

    The Department’s role is to ensure that the casinos have, and are applying, their policies to identify and approach problem gamblers. The numbers of exclusion orders are reported to the Department by the casinos.

    Inspectors regularly audit each casino, including checks on cash handling, operation of gaming machines, compliance with game rules and problem gambling policies.


    The Gambling Act 2003, regulating casinos

    The Gambling Act has brought the biggest changes to the casino market since casinos were first permitted in New Zealand in 1990.

    The Gambling Act repealed the Casino Control Act and disestablished the Casino Control Authority (CCA). Most of the CCA’s responsibilities were transferred to the Department and the newly created Gambling Commission.

    While the Casino Control Act licensed casinos to promote tourism, employment and economic development, the Gambling Act prohibits any new casinos opening and prevents existing casinos increasing the opportunities for gambling.

    The previous Act made no reference to problem gambling or to providing information to the public. The stated purposes of the Gambling Act include to:
  • control the growth of gambling
  • prevent and minimise the harm caused by gambling, including problem gambling
  • facilitate responsible gambling
  • facilitate community involvement in decisions about the provision of gambling.

    Casino gambling, maximum numbers allowed under the Gambling Act
    Casino
    Gaming machines
    Tables
    Skycity Auckland
    1,647
    110
    Skycity Hamilton
    339
    23
    Christchurch
    500
    35
    Dunedin
    180
    12
    Queenstown Wharf
    74
    6
    Skycity Queenstown
    84
    11
    Totals
    2,824
    197

    Considerable further information about all forms of licensed gambling is available on the Department’s website at: Gambling

    Media contact

    Vince Cholewa
    Communications Advisor Phone 04 495 9350, Cellular 027 272 4270